Schema-Root.org logo

 

  cross-referenced news and research resources about

 Cox V. Louisiana

Schema-Root.org logo
images:  google   yahoo YouTube
spacer

updated Sun. August 7, 2022

-
Similarly, in the 1965 case Cox v. Louisiana, the court held that the government could not prosecute protesters for demonstrating in a location where the police had said the protest was allowed. Applying Raley and Cox to the immigration context would be an extension of these precedents, but hardly an ...

In a 1965 case, Cox v. Louisiana, the Supreme Court overturned disorderly conduct convictions of protesters who violated a law prohibiting demonstrations "in or near" a courthouse. Although they were across the street, the protesters relied upon police officers who gave them permission to protest there.
In 1965's Cox v. Louisiana, the court drew upon Raley's reasoning in overturning the conviction of a civil rights protester. Police officials had informed the man, the Rev. Ben Elton Cox Sr., that the law permitted him to protest across the street from a courthouse. But when he held a demonstration in that ...
Cox v. Louisiana (1965). d. Obscenity: Hard-core, highly sexually explicit pornography is not protected by the First Amendment. Miller v. California (1973). In practice, however, the government rarely prosecutes online distributors of such material. e. Child pornography: Photographs or videos involving actual ...
"This would be 'an indefensible sort of entrapment by the State — convicting a citizen for exercising a privilege which the State had clearly told him was available to him,' the 7th Circuit ruled, quoting from Cox v. Louisiana, a 1965 Supreme Court ruling that expanded protest rights by forbidding "breach of ...
For example, according to Cox v. Louisiana, a city may attempt to shield its judicial system from popular influence by restricting how close protesters can stand to a courthouse. Noise restrictions, too, are acceptable, according to Ward v. Rock Against Racism. Cities are also within their authority to require a ...
Cox v. Louisiana (1965). d. Obscenity: Hard-core, highly sexually explicit pornography is not protected by the First Amendment. Miller v. California (1973). In practice, however, the government rarely prosecutes online distributors of such material. e. Child pornography: Photographs or videos involving actual ...


 

news and opinion


 


 


 


 


schema-root.org

    usa
     government
      branches
       judicial branch
        supreme court
         decisions
          speech
            cox v. louisiana

US Supreme Court free speech decisions:
            aclu v. reno
            chaplinsky v. new hampshire
            cohen v. california
            cox v. louisiana
            elrod v. burns
            fcc v. pacifica foundation
            garrison v. louisiana
            gooding v. wilson
            hustler magazine v. falwell
            lebron v. national railroad
            martin v. city of struthers
            r.a.v. v. city of st. paul
            street v. new york
            terminiello v. chicago
            united states v. grace
            widmar v. vincent,